Tag Archives: The Renegade Chronicles

Meet Magic’s Daughter

In just three weeks, Magic’s Daughter will make its debut on the Radish app.

Meanwhile, I’ve conjured this Q&A to prepare you for my return to Altaerra.

Q&A

What is Magic’s Daughter about?

Behold, yon back-cover blurb:

A BLACK SHEEP IN RED ROBES

Selena Nelesti wants nothing to do with her noble name.

While her mother schemes to find her a highborn husband, young Selena escapes into her studies, learning about the warriors and wizards who shaped the world.

But ancient history cannot free her future. To destroy the shackles of duty and forge her own path, she must seek out new knowledge—forbidden knowledge.

All magic requires sacrifice, however, and if Selena is not careful, it may consume her completely.

At its core, Magic’s Daughter is a coming-of-age story of a girl who feels out of place in her own family as well as the world. The tale falls within the sword-and-sorcery fantasy genre.

Who is the book about?

Selena Nelesti, the youngest daughter of a Superian duke, is our protagonist. She’s smart, stubborn, and, at times, self-centered.

We also meet Selena’s parents, her many brothers and sisters (each with his/her own quirks), and a couple of love interests as she gets older.

What does the title mean?

Selena was named after the moon, where, according to myth, the Goddess of Magic dwell. Since Selena can’t relate to her mother and siblings, she fantasizes about running away and being someone—anyone—else.

“Family” is a big theme in this book; the title tips its (conical) hat to that.

Where does Magic’s Daughter take place?

The book is set in Altaerra, the same world as in The Renegade Chronicles. But whereas that trilogy primarily took place in the island province of Capricon, Magic’s Daughter focuses on Superius, the most powerful kingdom in the Continent United.

Altaerra is a medieval realm populated by humans, elves, dwarves, and other fantastic races. It’s also home to all kinds of magic.

Is Magic’s Daughter a sequel to The Renegade Chronicles?

Although I wrote Magic’s Daughter after The Renegade Chronicles, it actually takes place a few years before the events of that series.

So it’s a prequel then?

Not precisely. Magic’s Daughter starts before the Renegade War and ends during its aftermath. A few names from The Renegade Chronicles crop up, but Magic’s Daughter is about a new cast of characters in a different (though not-too-distant) part of the world.

Who is the intended audience for Magic’s Daughter? What’s it “rated”?

Any fan of sword-and-sorcery fantasy is susceptible to Magic’s Daughter’s spell. Because the book stars a 14-year-old girl, the story fits nicely into the young adult (YA) subgenre.

If it were a movie, it would be rated PG or maybe PG-13 for some violence and sexual situations.

What was your inspiration for this book?

Selena Nelesti is one of three wizardly characters who play a pivotal role in future storylines. Rather than start with a book about how the trio meets—and jump into another saga—I wanted to try my hand at a story entrenched in family drama and focused on a single character, rather than an ensemble as in The Renegade Chronicles.

Moreover, I wanted to explore why Selena is how/who she is when she eventually connects with her future companions.

Could I write a self-contained, coming-of-age story that champions intrigue over battle? Is Selena’s childhood and introduction to magic worth telling? Am I capable of weaving disparate mysteries together to create a satisfying story?

Magic’s Daughter answers those questions with a resounding “yes!”

Where will Magic’s Daughter be available?

The book will first be released on Radish, an app that specializes in serial fiction. The first seven chapters of the book will be available on Sept. 3, 2019.

The first three chapters will be free. Readers can pay virtual coins (that equate to real-world currency) if they wish to read ahead. New chapters will go live every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday thereafter.

I’ll publish the entire novel in paperback and e-book in spring 2020.

What’s next? Will there be more books set in Altaerra?

My initial hope was that Magic’s Daughter would serve as an alternate entry point into my Altaerra fiction and serve as a “Book 1” for a new series that centers on the magic-casters. I have half of a rough draft of a potential Book 2, so it’s altogether possible that their future adventures will be released in some way, shape, or form.

In the short term, however, my next novel will be a standalone YA portal fantasy set in a very different world. (More on that in the months to come!)

Where can buy The Renegade Chronicles?

So glad you asked!

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A return to Altaerra

Dorothy was right: there’s no place like home.

A long time ago, I built a fantasy world and penned countless adventures across many of its locations and time periods.

I eventually wrote a series of sword-and-sorcery novels set in Altaerra and, much later, published them, releasing Rebels and Fools, Heroes and Liars, and Martyrs and Monsters on an otherwise unremarkable Tuesday in 2016.

Then I moved onto a new series, not anticipating a return to Altaerra anytime soon.

Neither did I expect that returning home to my story about a wickedly brilliant witch would feel so good.

Backstory

I mentioned Magic’s Daughter briefly last month, listing it among my upcoming projects. To start at the beginning, I wrote the first draft of Magic’s Daughter immediately after finishing the final book of The Renegade Chronicles in 2005.

The goal was to write a story that could serve as a bridge between The Renegade Chronicles and a new series that focused on spell-casters, including Selena Nelesti, the titular character of Magic’s Daughter. Worst case scenario, Magic’s Daughter would be a standalone novel.

But even though I completed a first draft of the book, I never truly finished it.

I read the completed manuscript, took notes for editing, and then didn’t touch it again for years. I simply couldn’t get motivated to work on it. For one thing, it was a very different from The Renegade Chronicles (more on that later), and for another, I was eager to write what happened next.

Which I did.

In fact, I made it halfway through the sequel before stalling out. It felt like I was connecting the dots between the two series and, truth be told, I was feeling burned out. I had been reading and writing sword-and-sorcery fantasy, exclusively, for a dozen years. Nothing felt fresh anymore.

Could it be that I was—gasp!—tired of Altaerra?

Plot twist

Before I explain why I picked up Magic’s Daughter again after 14 years, let me expound on the differences between The Renegade Chronicles and this “new” book:

  • Magic’s Daughter starts well before the Renegade War and only tangentially touches upon the political strife in Continae.
  • Whereas The Renegade Chronicles features an ensemble cast with multiple point-of-view characters scattered across Capricon, Magic’s Daughter focuses on a single protagonist (Selena) in Superius.
  • Because it functions something like a biography, Magic’s Daughter favors drama and intrigue over fast-faced action. (Think of it as a slow burn rather than a barrage of flashy fireballs.)
  • While a few familiar names from The Renegade Chronicles pop up in Magic’s Daughter, Selena’s story introduces people, places, and concepts that stretch far beyond the rebellion and the wars that follow.
map of Western Arabond

Whereas The Renegade Chronicles primarily took place in Capricon (that small island south of the mainland), Magic’s Daughter is set in Superius.

For these reasons (and more), I’ve been reluctant to rework Magic’s Daughter, though I never stopped thinking about it. In fact, I reread it shortly after The Renegade Chronicles were released. Since then, I had earmarked it as a story more suitable for some other storytelling medium—such as a comic book or a serial novel, perhaps released chapter by chapter on my own website.

When I stumbled onto an article about a popular app for publishing serial fiction, I knew I had to give it a shot.

A happy ending…hopefully

Radish (https://radishfiction.com) puts thousands of serialized stories at readers’ fingertips. It’s built on the premise that people like reading on their phones or tablets during their commute, while on break, or in some other small pocket of time.

Quick and easy—kind of like magic.

Authors can choose how they want to release (and monetize) their fiction on Radish. Here’s how it will work with Magic’s Daughter:

  • The first seven chapters of the book will be released on Radish in early September.
  • The first three chapters will be free. Readers can pay virtual coins (that equate to real-world money) if they want to read ahead.
  • New chapters will go live every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday thereafter.
  • Eager readers can spend coins to read the new chapters immediately, while more frugal fans can wait for them to become free a few days later.

Once the book has been published in full on Radish—and after the statute of limitations has expired—I will publish the entire novel in paperback and ebook, likely in May 2020.

Work in progress

As I write this, Magic’s Daughter is in the process of being proofed, and a few beta readers are paging through it. I hope to have the teaser as well as more information about the characters and plot ready to share in August.

Expect a cover reveal in the next couple of months, too.

In September, I’ll share the link and instructions for accessing the free preview and, if you like what you see, additional chapters.

I can’t wait to introduce the readers of this world to Selena, Superius, and the Assembly of Magic. If I owned a pair of ruby slippers—or some other means of trans-dimensional teleportation magic—why, we’d already be home!

Want to learn more about Altaerra?

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Booked

stacks and stacks of books

My latest novel, If Dreams Can Die, launched just last month, but I’m already elbow-deep in The Big Shiny New.

No, that’s not the name of a new book, but an umbrella term for the myriad projects and events currently on my plate. I’ll go into more detail in the months ahead, but for now, here’s an overview of what’s coming next from yours truly.

(Note to self: consider the title The Big Shiny New for a future work.)

Projects

Magic’s Daughter

Who: For fans of sword-and-sorcery fantasy, especially folks who enjoyed The Renegade Chronicles, with a possible skewing toward a female demographic.

What: A novel set in Altaerra before and during The Renegade War starring Selena Nelesti, a young noblewoman who proves knowledge is both power and peril.

When: Magic’s Daughter will be released as a serial (i.e. chapter by chapter) via the Radish app starting in Fall 2019 and as a paperback and e-book in 2020.

Where: https://radishfiction.com

Why: Partly because I want to explore a new revenue stream and partly because the story and intended audience lends itself to the medium.

‘Sir Larpsalot’

Who: For YA readers, especially males age 13-15.

What: A humorous adventure about teen larpers (live-action roleplayers) who must work together to rescue their friend from an all-too-real fantasy realm. Think Galaxy Quest meets D&D.

When: I hope to have my outline done this fall and complete a first draft by the end of the year. Release date could be as early as 2020 but more likely 2021.

Where: the paperback and e-book will be available at Amazon.com.

Why: Sir Larpsalot started as an idea for a comic book character, but over time, the concept evolved into a book with a full-fledged cast of characters (including Elvish Presley and Tom Foolery). I’m looking forward to writing a book my kids can read and enjoy.

New Website

Who: For present and future fans of my fiction.

What: A complete overhaul of this website, courtesy of BrownBoots Interactive (where I work as a content specialist).

When: Sometime later this year.

Where: david-michael-williams.com

Why: My current site is 7 years old, which is equivalent to 97 in website years. I need more functionality than an out-of-the-box, WordPress-hosted website offers—and can’t wait to be rid of the stupid ads that pop up everywhere!

Events

Downtown Fond du Lac Farmers Market

Who: Fond du Lac members of the Allied Authors of Wisconsin: Mark J. Engels, Thomas P. Ramirez, Christopher Whitmore, and I.

What: We’ll be selling and signing our books at the local farmers market.

When: 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 15.

Where: In front of the Gallery & Frame Shop, 94 S. Main St., Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.

Why: The Downtown Fond du Lac Farmers Market is very well attended. Hopefully some of the marketgoers appreciate good books.

Books Books Books Books (Books)

Who: Friends, family, neighbors, and anyone else who loves books!

What: Instead of a traditional book release event, I’m combining the celebration of my new novel with a rummage sale featuring hundreds of used books, fiction and nonfiction, across a variety of genres—all for 25 cents apiece. Earnings support my future writing and publishing endeavors.

When: 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, June 22.

Where: Outside my home, 1122 Carriage Circle, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.

Why: Cover art, Library of Congress registrations, barcodes, ISBNs, proof copies, miscellaneous marketing efforts—these things cost money, which means I must sell more books.

I’m booked for a few more gigs farther out. The new website will have a page devoted to events, but for now, you can find details on Facebook.

Busy is good. Although I feel fully booked right now, I wouldn’t be surprised if a few more events appeared on my agenda before year’s end.

The writing is on the wall.

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Renegade Chronicles coming to tabletop RPGs

After playing a one-shot Dungeons & Dragons adventure over the course of three days, I’ve decided to transform my sword-and-sorcery trilogy into game modules.

The decision comes after diving headfirst into the world of D&D last year. I estimate it’ll take me 3.5 years to transpose Rebels and Fools into a tabletop RPG and another 8.25 years to prepare the other two books as well as at least one bonus adventure that explains what the heck happens in Port Town after Klye’s band of rebels leave.

I could’ve jumped into writing a new novel, since The Soul Sleep Cycle is all but done, but it’s just easier to repackage something old than come up with new.

Features of The Renegade Chronicles games will include:

  • Every natural 20 will summon an army of drunken midge who cast random Level 9 spells on your enemies.
  • Every natural 1 will summon an army of drunk midge who cast random Level 9 spells on you and your party.
  • During every short rest, Scout will regale you will useless facts about the island. (Did you know that the best mutton in Capricon can be found in the village of Aron?)
  • All NPCs will be romanceable—except for Opal.
  • You can import your characters from other tabletop games, though dragonborn, tieflings, and any other races not native to Altaerra will be automatically converted into boring Level 1 human fighters.
  • Druids will be able to turn into Shek’s two-tailed scorpion, Ranfir (and only Ranfir).
  • You can recruit powerful NPCs to your party, including Father Elezar, Albert Simplington, and that one guy who leads the band of highwaymen in the second book.
  • Everyone gets 1 luck point, regardless of class, whenever Klye says, “I don’t believe in luck.”
  • Avoid TPKs by using time magic to kill Dark Lily when she’s still a kid.
  • If at any point you find yourself dual wielding the vorpal sword and Chrysaal-rûn, you win.

The D&D-inspired Renegade Chronicles modules will be available on eBay.com and Facebook Marketplace after I’ve play-tested them a bunch. So as not confuse the game with the book, the first campaign will be called Fools and Fools.

(Happy April 1st, everyone!)

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Cover reveal: If Sin Dwells Deep

By auspicious happenstance, my 100th blog post coincides with another milestone: the completion of my next book’s cover.

Behold!

If Sin Dwells Deep will be published as a paperback and for Kindle on Oct. 2, 2018. The Kindle version will be available for preorder at the end of the month IS AVAILABLE FOR PREORDER NOW!

Here’s the back-cover text to tide you over until then:

Even good girls have secrets.

When straight-laced Allison sleeps, the rebellious goddess Syn wakes. Having a fling in the dreamscape may seem like harmless fun, but when a sadistic predator learns her true identity, the fantasy begins to bleed into real life.

If Sin Dwells Deep—a parallel novel to If Souls Can Sleep—exposes the hidden world of dream drifters and explores the war between gifted government agents and those who would use their abilities to corrupt life, death, and that which lies beyond.

Because I’m up to my elbows in pre-release book marketing tactics (which will likely include penning some guest posts), I’ve elected to use the rest of this article to highlight some of my favorite posts from this blog.

Without further ado, here’s my Top 10 blog posts…so far:

10. Celebrating a writing milestone? Listen up!

About three years ago, I created a soundtrack for a novel I was working on. The songs all—directly or indirectly—tie into the plot and characters of If Sin Dwells Deep. (Available soon!)

9. It’s a…business!

This short but significant post announced the birth of One Million Words LLC, my indie publishing company. The business, now 2½ years old, resembles a toddler today: lots of unexpected fun and requiring constant supervision.

8. How to make a person

No, this isn’t sex education. I once used this blog to share writing tips, and this post featured a series of interview questions to get to know your characters better and transform them from two-dimensional ideas to full-fledged human beings.

(Pro tip: I recently used these same questions to flesh out my new D&D character.)

7. Why sci-fi and fantasy?

I get asked this question a lot.

6. What every writer needs

Spoiler: it’s an audience. I followed this post up with three others related posts: What else a writer needs to succeed (Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3). While I think this series could be helpful to other writers, I’m including it here because it also gives readers a glimpse into a writer’s journey (and psyche).

5. The Good, The Bad, and The Ungrammatical

The odds are I’ll never make a video game about grammar, but what I love about this post is the reminder that writing doesn’t always have to be a serious and that writers should always have a dream or two in their back pockets.

4. ‘Who is your book about?’

I composed a “Meet the Renegades” blurb as far back as fall 1997, when I was drafting the first chapters of what would eventually become Rebels and Fools. That guide was meant for the English instructor reviewing my chapters for an independent study class. It was with great excitement that I introduced the rest of the world to Klye Tristan and the gang.

3. Friends and family of writers, beware

Another common question from readers: where do you get your ideas from? The answer: just about everywhere, including the people closest to us.

2. Why writers groups still matter

I wrote this treatise on the importance of writers groups more than five years ago, and I still believe strongly in the message. In fact, a fellow Allied Authors member and I tackled this very topic on the Read.Write.Repeat. podcast, which will air later this month.

1. Storytelling can take many forms

Predating my life as a writer, I told my stories by other means. Before the cast of The Renegade Chronicles made it to the page, they were LEGO minifigs. As a nod to my humble roots, I transcribed the characters from If Souls Can Sleep into the same medium, bringing my fiction full circle.

I’d like to thank all of my readers over the years. I hope you’ll enjoy not only my next book, but also many more blog posts to come.

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My year of yes

While watching a hardscrabble soccer game with my son, I proffered this platitude:

“You miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take.”

Cue the eye roll.

My 10-year-old swiftly informed me there were posters proclaiming that very notion scattered throughout his school—three of them. Cliché though the expression may be, it’s nonetheless true that you can’t succeed if you don’t try. And probability suggests the more often you try, the better your odds of achieving.

I didn’t realize I was taking my own (borrowed) advice until I caught Yes Man on HBO the other night. That’s the one where a play-it-safe, stuck-in-a-rut loan officer makes a covenant with himself, promising to say yes to every request and opportunity.

In the movie, operating in an affirmative absolute yielded comical results. But this is real life. Unlike Jim Carrey’s character, I’d never blindly agree to everything. Lately, however, I’ve started forcing myself to come up with reasons to do something rather than not doing it.

As a result, 2018 is proving to be a year of trying new things and taking chances.

Destabilizing events

It began at the end of last year. While updating my business plan, I made the decision to attend more events. Why? My records showed I sold more books face-to-face than through any other marketing tactics in 2016 and 2017.

As a result, I earmarked a handful of conventions, conferences, and occasions where one might peddle one’s literary wares. Some were repeat appearances, but I also added a few new events, including Lakefly Writers Conference and WisCon.

So far sales have varied greatly from venue to venue. However, I’ve also realized networking can be its own reward.

Destination: collaboration

I was fortunate enough to meet two other fantasy authors at Lakefly. We had fun trading stories about our individual writing, publishing, and marketing experiences before the the doors to the vendor room opened as well as over lunch. Those conversations continue today via group chats.

There’s certainly value in learning from the successes and missteps of other writers’ “yeses.”

The biggest thing to come out of meeting Malinda Andrews and Rebekah K. Bryan, however, was an invitation to contribute Rebels and Fools to an e-book box set comprised of six complete fantasy novels.

In fact, Sixfold Fantasy became a reality earlier this month. Buy it here.

The play’s the thing

Sometimes opportunities pass us by without our even knowing. That almost happened to me a week ago when an email that looked suspiciously like spam popped into my inbox. Thankfully, I took a closer read before banishing it to my junk folder.

Lo and behold, it ended up being an invitation to participate in something called the 24-Hour Theater Experience. This October, a handful of writers will be given a theme, number of characters, and nine hours to write a 10-minute play, which will then be rehearsed and performed by the local community theater troupe at a swanky Fond du Lac venue—all within in the span of a single day.

Turns out someone recommended me to be one of the writers. (Thanks, Dusty!)

Now I don’t fancy myself a playwright, but I do have experience writing scripts for commercials and other videos. It’s always a thrill to see actual people speaking the words you put on a page.

Comfort zone? Looks like I’m gonna exit stage left.

Action affirmative

Here’s another adage: man plans, and God laughs.

I try to keep my production calendar as flexible as possible. Some projects—such as a comic book collaboration codenamed ONE-SHOT—started out as a “yes” but collectively became “no, not right now.”

On the other hand, I just finished writing a short story that was decidedly not part of Plan A and am contemplating publishing an e-book anthology of my shorter works—though not until 2019.

Yes, 2018 has already put plenty on my plate!

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2016 vs. 2017 (vs. 2018)

While numbers don’t lie, they don’t always cast the clearest reflection of reality.

Take 2017, for example. When comparing my business plan’s projections to what actually came to pass last year, I find that One Million Words and its president, publisher, and author—in other words, yours truly—have come up short:

1. Officially, zero books were published.

2. Two short stories were slated for publication in 2017, but neither released.

3. My Pun-a-Day Calendar campaign on Kickstarter proved unsuccessful.

4. Sales forecasts for The Renegade Chronicles dwarfed actual units sold.

5. While I did write the second draft of an existing novel, as planned, I did not achieve my goal of starting a new book.

On the surface, 2017 was fraught with failure. Digging a little deeper, however, I find I’m pretty proud of what I accomplished last year:

1. Although I didn’t publish any of my novels, I set aside time to help a friend publish his memoir, That Wonderful Mexican Band. Production-wise, I also got If Souls Can Sleep 99% of the way to market and made it available for pre-order during the 2017 Christmas shopping season.

2. Short stories “Ghost Mode” and “The Lake Road” are now expected to appear anthologies planned for 2018. Let’s call that a delayed success.

3. Was I disappointed that my Pun-a-Day Calendar campaign failed? Sure. Did I learn a lot in the process? Certainly. Scrapping this project also meant I was able to work ahead on If Souls Can Sleep so that it will release months ahead of time. (Jan. 30, people!)

4. The Renegade Chronicles’ sales have slowed to a trickle. It’s difficult to put a positive spin on that, but then again I didn’t put much money or time behind marketing the series in 2017, choosing instead to invest in the production and promotion of my next series, The Soul Sleep Cycle.

5. I guess writing my best-selling YA fantasy novel will just have to wait. Having said that, I did spend some time working on a clandestine collaboration that allowed me to flex my creativity in new and exciting ways. (I hope to share more about this project later this year.)

Analysis

Call it an obsession with stats—or maybe just a penchant for oversharing—but here, for the record, is how things shook out in 2017, compared to 2016.

If numbers aren’t your thing, go ahead and scroll down to the next section.

Bar graph showing breakdown of hours worked in 2017

Books published

  • 2016: 5
  • 2017: 0

Books sold

  • 2016: 164
  • 2017: 60

Total hours worked for One Million Words

  • 2016: 691.00
  • 2017: 603.75

Breakdown of time

  • 2016:
    • Writing: 190.00
    • Publishing: 183.00
    • Marketing: 185.00
    • Passion projects: 35.00
    • Business day to day: 41.50
    • Research and other random tasks: 56.50
  • 2017
    • Writing: 194.75
    • Publishing: 104.25
    • Marketing: 125.75
    • Passion projects: 93.50
    • Business day to day: 46.50
    • Research and other random tasks: 39.00

Looking ahead at 2018

Author vs. Publisher

I created One Million Words not because I wanted to become a publisher, necessarily, but because a publisher was needed to get books from my personal computer out to the masses. In a perfect world, I’d spend the majority of my time writing and editing novels, and playing the part of publisher would be a small but very necessary evil.

Unfortunately, my publisher hat must remain firmly in place for the time being.  Perhaps it’s only fair, since I wore my author hat for years while writing the first three books of The Soul Sleep Cycle. Those novels aren’t going to publish themselves.

Because I’ve decided to publish all three books within a relatively short amount of time—six to nine months between releases rather than a more typical twelve to fifteen—that doesn’t leave me much time in between promoting the launch of Book One and beginning the production schedule for Book Two.

And it certainly means I won’t be authoring the first draft of a brand-new novel before mid 2019.

The Renegade Chronicles vs. The Soul Sleep Cycle

They say an author’s back catalog is one of his greatest marketing tools. That’s a very good thing since I have neither the time nor the capital to invest in further promoting The Renegade Chronicles. Here’s to hoping that readers who stumble upon that trilogy give my new one a shot and vice versa.

Of course, I’ll continue to sign and sell copies of The Renegade Chronicles at upcoming events, but 2018 is going to be all about marketing If Souls Can Sleep and then If Sin Dwells Deep in the fall.

Why step away from The Renegade Chronicles? For starters, the success of If Souls Can Sleep will greatly impact the success of the new series as a whole. So if The Soul Sleep Cycle is to have any chance at finding its audience, I can’t afford to be splitting my efforts between rebels and dream drifters.

Introvert vs. Extrovert

I won’t lie: I’m far more comfortable sitting behind a computer screen than taking my show on the road. The author in me bristles at being pulled away from the narrative to navigate real-world obligations, though the publisher in me understands that publishing without selling is pointless.

I do a fair amount of marketing from the comfort of my own home—including writing these blog posts—but there’s no denying the fact that I sell more copies of my books at events than I do through other marketing channels. Which is why I already have four appearances scheduled for 2018, including the If Souls Can Sleep book release/signing on Feb. 10.

Keep an eye on my Facebook Events page to see where this introvert will turn up next.

Work vs. Play

Passion projects are good because they give one the opportunity to step away from the norm and try something different—and possibly help others in the process.

Too many of these diversions at once, however, are detrimental to productivity on all fronts.

With that in mind, I’m committing my One Million Words time to a single side project in 2018. Admittedly, this secret initiative is a just-for-fun kind of endeavor—yet my inner businessman is quick to point out that the project might one day turn a profit.

This isn’t to say that editing, publishing, and promoting my novels isn’t fun, but I have to admit it’s nice to cleanse the palate every now and then, especially when I have a dozen months of publishing and promoting ahead of me.

So that’s the plan. And if anything changes along the way, I’m sure you’ll read about it here.

If Souls Can Sleep cover displayed on a tablet and as a paperbackPsst!

My new novel, If Souls Can Sleep, is coming Jan. 30.

Preorder it here.

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